Thoughts on My Exhibition of War

Came back to steamy Delhi last week after spending a couple of weeks in Japan to attend my exhibition at the Canon gallery. It went well (the show is still traveling to three more cities in Japan) and I had good conversations with visitors.

The title of the exhibition was “Message from the Battlefield” and it’s a collection of pictures from conflict zones I’ve photographed in the last 15 years. Unfortunately, I was able to exhibit only 60% of what I wanted to show because of restrictions set by Canon: “No dead bodies and no blood can be shown.” The exhibition was about war so I couldn’t understand how they could impose such a request. Although I didn’t fully agree with the conditions, the opportunity was too good to miss. I compromised by adding a few images which ‘partially’ showing dead body and blood.

This kind of nonsense happens not only with Canon but everywhere in Japan, including by Yahoo! Japan which I have mentioned in this blog before. It’s a reflection of a conservative ‘Don’t rock the boat’ attitude of Japanese corporations. It comes down to the fact that no one wants to take responsibility in case viewers complain.

Because of this reason, most of photo exhibitions in Japan are about non-controversial themes like landscape and animals. Any themes with politics, wars and serious social issues are completely out of favor. One of sad example is the cancellation of a photo exhibition by Nikon gallery in 2012. Nikon suddenly canceled a show about “comfort women” (sexual slaves during the war used by Japanese soldiers) because of pressure from right-wing and anti-immigrant groups.

“We seldom see these kind of pictures in galleries”

As many visitors of my exhibition told me, unfortunately there are very few major galleries that deal with photographs of wars, conflicts and hard news.

Helped by a few newspaper articles, more than 1,200 people visited my exhibition in six days, which was far more than I expected. Although I was able to speak to only a small portion of them in person, it was encouraging to be told by many that they felt these images should be shown more often and in more places.  I realized that controversial images are avoided not because people don’t want to see them but because those who could show them worry too much. They underestimate viewers by assuming that disturbing issues like war and conflict aren’t of interest. They are too scared of offending through shocking images. It’s an act of ‘self-censorship’.

Japan seems to be quickly moving backward toward a dangerous pre-war era of militarism with the recent introduction of a sweeping new law to protect state secrets and moves to expand the overseas military activities of its Self-Defense Forces. At this critical time, self-censorship keeps happening, and we should realize that it’s extinguishing our civil liberties, the public’s right to know, and the opportunity to think freely.

~~~~

2週間の日本滞在を終えて、先週また暑いデリーに戻ってきた。

今回は、キャノン・ギャラリーでの自分の個展開催のために東京に戻ったのだが、銀座の会場に詰めているあいだ、訪れてくれた人々と話をしながらいろいろと考えさせられた。

個展のタイトルは「紛争地からのメッセージ」。その名のとおり、僕がこれまで15年ほどのあいだに訪れた紛争地からの写真を集めたものだが、実は僕がみせたかった写真の6割程しか展示できなかった。キャノンから「死体や血はダメ」と釘をさされていたからだ。

「戦争写真の展示なのに、死体や血がみせられないとは…」

どうにも理解し難い条件ではあったが、ここで意地を張ってせっかくの機会を逃すのも惜しいので、妥協の上、死体や血も「ちょっとだけ出した」作品を混ぜ込んだ。

まあこういった要求はキャノンに限ったことではなく、以前このブログでも紹介したヤフー・ジャパンとの一件も含めて、日本企業の保守的な「事なかれ主義」なのだと思う。結局のところ、死体などの衝撃的(?)な写真を展示して、見た人から苦情がきたら誰も責任をとりたがらない、ということなのだろう。こんな状況だから、写真展でいえば、日本でひらかれるものの大半は風景や動物など当たり障りのないものばかりで、政治的な主張を含んだり、社会的問題提議をするようなものは敬遠されがちになる。一昨年にニコン・ギャラリーが、開催の決まっていた安世鴻氏の慰安婦写真展を、在特会や右翼の脅しに負けて一方的に中止したのも情けない一例だ。僕の写真展を訪れてくれた人々の何人もが、「こういった写真はなかなかギャラリーでみる機会がない」と言っていたように、今の日本のメジャーなギャラリー、特に企業の絡む会場で、現代の戦争や社会問題を扱ってくれるところなど、非常に少ないのではないだろうか?

いくつかの新聞社がとりあげてくれたこともあって、6日間で1200人以上という、僕が予想していたより遥かに多くの人たちが今回の個展を訪れてくれた。面と向かって話ができたのはそのうちほんの一部だが、「もっとこういう写真を頻繁に、多くの人たちにみせるべきだ」と言ってくれた人が少なくなかったことは励みだ。と同時に、こんなことに気づかされた。実は、人々がみたくないからこういった写真が展示されにくいのではなくて、みせる側が、「こういう硬くて深刻な題材は一般受けしない」とか「ショッキングな写真をみて気分を害したという苦情が怖い」という理由で単に「自己規制」しているだけなんじゃないか、と。

特定秘密保護法案とか集団的自由権の閣議決定などで、いまの日本はすごいスピードで歴史を逆行し、戦前に戻るかの如く危ない方向に向かっている。そんななか、メディアやギャラリーのように「発信する側」が、こんな検閲のような「自己規制」を続けていくのは問題だと思う。これはぼくら国民から、知る権利や考える機会を確実に奪っているのだから。

 

 

 

 

 

show hide 2 comments

Keisuke Togawa - 面と向かって雑談した一人です。
お疲れさまでした。

原爆写真は白黒だからOKなんでしょうか。
しかしカメラメーカーのCANONがそのような姿勢ではナンセンスです。
クレームを理由にする官民国民の体質。
僕はLeicaに変えます(苦笑
そして血のにじんだステーキなどの写真展をしたいと思います。

http://manda10kichi.blog.fc2.com/

Manda - この記事を読み終わったアメリカの友人は、ha?! でした。
「ショッキングな写真をみて気分を害したという苦情が怖い」
だったらカメラを売るんじゃない。写真を見て気分を害するならおとなしくウチで寝てろ。
そのように感想を述べていました。

あるアメリカ人の発言「FreeとFreedomは異なる」。
つまり現実はunFreeだってことでしょうか。

I Refuse to send My Daughter to War

I’m angry and also ashamed of Japanese PM Abe, his cabinet and of ourselves -Japanese citizens. Three days ago, Abe changed the interpretation of our constitution and paved the way for our military to go to fight overseas.

Under our constitution, which was created after the horrific experience of WWII, Japan has been barred form using the military to resolve conflicts except for self-defense. Now, following cabinet approval, our military can be used for “collective self-defense” to participate in wars involving any allies even if there is no immediate threat to Japan.  Pressure from bureaucrats, who blindly follow U.S. requests, and those of the weapons industry, are behind this but Abe has been wanting to militarize Japan for quite some time. The decision became his first big step toward realizing his dream. But I’m wondering how many Japanese realize that Abe’s dream is costing our common people’s future blood and lives?

I understand that those who support Abe’s decision feel threatened by neighboring countries, especially China, which recently accelerated its aggressive claims to expand its territories. But in order to defend Japan, we can just keep our self-defense force as it is and certainly do not need to participate in ‘someone else’s’ war.

As a photographer who has experienced several battlefields, my hatred towards war is not logical but a physical reaction. The sound of constant explosions tearing your eardrums, the smell of rotten bodies, dead infant with their brains scattered, piles of bodies dumped at morgues … all these things get in your body and become unforgettable. No matter what kind of justifications politicians or leaders make, for the people on the ground war just causes nothing but destruction, deaths and hate. War is wrong and evil.

Seventy years since our war ended, I doubt if any incumbent Japanese politician has any experience on battlefield, including Abe. What they are missing is the physical experience of war and empathy. If your body knows how cruel and disgusting the battlefield is, or at least you can imagine it, there’s no way you can make such an easy decision to lead citizens to fight.

What the Japanese government needs is not changing constitution to go to war but enhancing diplomacy skills. As it reflects on a recent series of ‘slips of the tongue’ scandals, the quality of politicians has terribly deteriorated. Many of them seem to be so childish and have no brain for international relations or history. It may be too late for those people but how about to educate them, get help from specialists and scholars, or add more new young blood who has international experience and a broader view? We won’t have to worry about the war if we have a good relationship with neighboring countries. That’s far more important than putting more money on the military budget.

But at the end, it comes down to how we, ordinary people, take action. Like the last general elections with only 50% voting rate, if we remain unconcerned and looking away from the reality, there is no hope. It will be far too late to complain when your son or daughter get drafted and killed on the battlefield on the other side of the world. I have no desire at all to send my daughter to battlefield for those politicians and bureaucrats.

(My exhibition “Message from Battlefield” will be held at Canon Galleries in Japan from July 10 ~. Please stop by if you are interested. http://cweb.canon.jp/gallery/archive/takahashi-hotspot/index.html )

~~~~

腹がたって、情けない。安倍総理、日本政府、そして我が日本国民たち。

3日まえに憲法解釈が安倍政権によってねじ曲げられ、また日本が「戦争のできる国」に一歩近づいた。第二次大戦の悲惨な経験のあとにつくられた平和憲法のもので、これまでかろうじて日本の武力行使は「自衛のため」だけに限られてきた。それが今度の解釈変更で、「集団自衛権」が認められるようになり、日本に直接の危害が及ばなくても、同盟国さえ絡んでいれば世界のどこの紛争にも顔をつっこめるようになったのだ。

米国に尻尾をふってすがっていきたい官僚たちや、金になる武器を増産したい産業界からの要請も背景にあるだろうが、こうして日本を軍国にもどすのは安倍総理の長年の夢だった。今回の解釈改憲はその悲願達成の第一歩となったわけだ。しかしこれが、将来の国民の血と引き換えに成されているのだということを、一体どれだけの人々がわかっているのだろうか。

近年領土拡張で一層その強引さを増してきた中国など、日本の国益を脅かす材料があるのは理解しているし、いざというときのために軍事を備えておきたいという、改憲賛成派の心情はそれなりに理解できる。しかし、日本の国防なら、集団自衛権は必要ないだろうし、現行のままで十分なはずだ。同盟国がピンチだからといって、わざわざ中東やアフリカの戦争に加担する必要などない。

戦場というものをいくつか経験してきたフォトグラファーとして、僕には確固として譲れない思いがある。それは理由などどうあれ、「戦争は絶対悪」ということだ。耳の鼓膜を破るようなひっきりなしの爆音、死体の腐乱の匂い、脳みその飛び散った子供、まるで生ゴミのごとく積み上げられた何十もの屍…こんな、戦地での音や匂い、理不尽な殺戮の光景は、記憶した体が決して忘れることはない。そんな戦争への拒絶感は、僕にとっては理屈云々ではなく、体感的なものだ。

日本の戦後70年が経ついま、安倍総理や現職の議員のうち、戦場を経験したことのある人などいるのだろうか?彼らに欠けているのは、絶対的にその体感だ。おまけに彼らは想像力が乏しいからそういうことに思いを巡らすことさえできない。戦地の醜さを身をもって知っている人間、もしくはそれを想像できる人間であれば、こんなに安易に戦争への道をひらくことなど出来やしないはずだと思う。

今、日本に必要なのは、軍備どうこう以前に、体たらくな議員・官僚の外交能力を高める方が重要なのではないか?最近の、空いた口の塞がらぬような発言スキャンダルの数々をみても、近年の議員達の質はひどいものだ。歴史や国際認識に欠け、人間的にも幼稚に思える人がなんと多いことか。そこまで落ちてしまった人たちにつける薬などないかもしれないが、それでも勉強させるなり、国際政治の専門家の力を借りる、国際感覚をもった新しい若い力を投入するなどして、近隣諸国との建設的な外交にもっとエネルギーを注いでもらいたい。他の国々としっかりした関係を構築できれば、もともと戦争の心配などせずにすむのだから。軍事費拡大よりこちらのほうが遥かに重要なはずだ。

しかし、結局のところは国民がどれだけ政府に対する意思表示をするかにかかっているわけで、昨年の選挙のようにあれだけ騒がれながらも、投票率50パーセント前後の無関心さを通すのなら、あまり希望はないだろう。数年後に自分たちの子供が徴兵されて、どこか地球の裏側の戦地で死ぬような憂き目をみてから文句をいっても、もう手遅れだ。僕はこんな政治家たちのために、将来娘を戦地におくるつもりなど、毛頭ない。

(お知らせ キャノンギャラリーにて7月10日より個展「紛争地からのメッセージ」開催 興味があればお越し下さい。http://cweb.canon.jp/gallery/archive/takahashi-hotspot/index.html )

 

 

 

no comments

A thought in Iran

Earlier this month, I visited Iran for the first time. Although it was a short trip (I was only given a 7-day stay permit), it was quite interesting and the positive experience left a good impression of the country on me.

As many of you may agree, Iran tends to come with negative images because of its political stance against western countries, especially against Americans. Most of the news we hear from the western media is about the threat of Iran’s nuclear weapon program or its hostile attitude against the U.S. and Israel. We don’t hear a lot of positive things.

But once I spent some time in the country and made a few good friends, my preconceptions totally changed. I was impressed not only by its historical Persian culture and art, but also by the relaxed attitude of the people – the hotel clerk, shop owners, translator and a driver – whom I met. They were friendly but not in an overwhelming way. I was quite comfortable around them.

One of the most interesting things was what our translator told us over dinner one night. The well-educated mid-30s man said that more than 90% of Iranians wish the Khomeini revolution didn’t happen.

“If the 1979 revolution hadn’t happened, the country could have developed far more by now,” he said.

I was a bit skeptical about what he said at first but then he told me what happened on that day. He was in the middle seat between two elder men on the domestic flight which we were on. After everyone got on board, the flight was delayed for an hour without any explanation. The two elders sitting next to him apologized, saying “Sorry for your young generation that we caused the revolution.” The elders meant that if the country had developed without interference from the revolution, more reliable transportation systems would’ve been established.

This story made sense to my experience – people are not as anti-Westernization as I was expecting. I didn’t feel any threat nor did I encounter any negativity from anyone while roaming around and taking pictures on the street. A few Caucasian tourists I saw seemed to be relaxed as well. What the government says is not necessarily the same as people feel or think. The Iranian government may be a hardcore anti-Western one but it doesn’t mean that the Iranian people feel the same way towards Americans and Europeans. Iranians may be well aware of the gap between them and the post-revolution government. It’s just not so clear to foreigners like us because this kind of thing never get reported by the media unless it grows bigger into anti-government protest or something.

As the current situation in Iraq deteriorates, the importance of Iran’s roll to stabilize the region is growing. It’s no question that Iran’s influence in the Middle East is expanding drastically. I was glad that I had an opportunity to have a glimpse into the country.

I know it was only the surface and I didn’t have a chance to observe any of the society’s deeper problems. But Iran certainly became one of the countries I would love to visit again. Though there were a few downsides. There’s no beer. (The closest you can get is zero-alcohol beer) Also, too many attractive souvenirs in the market, which make it hard to tighten the purse strings. This time, all my wages from the 4-day assignment turned into a carpet before I left the country.

〜〜〜〜

2週間程前に、初めてイランを訪れた。許可された日数が7日間だけだったので短い滞在だったが、それでも興味深い経験ができて、イランに対する僕の印象はがらりと良くなった。

イランといえば、欧米メディアによって、その過激な反欧米姿勢(特に前大統領アフマディネジャドのとき)や核兵器製造疑惑などばかりが報道が報道されるので、どうしてもネガティブなイメージがつきまとう国だろう。ところが国内で幾ばくかの時間を過ごし、僅かながらも友人もできると、その先入観が間違いだったことにすぐに気づかされた。長い歴史のある文化や芸術は圧巻ものだし、町のなかの雰囲気や人々と自分あいだの距離感が、なんとはなしに居心地がいいのだ。ホテルのスタッフ、市場の親父さん、雇った通訳やドライバーなど、市井の人々もみなフレンドリーだが、こちらが疲れるような大袈裟さはない。通りでも一応放っておいてくれて、必要な時には親切にしてくれる、といった感じか。予想していた反欧米感などは、人々のあいだからまったく感じられることもなかった。

「1979年の革命がおこらなかったら、この国はもっと発展していたのに」

ある晩、一緒に食事をしながら、通訳の口からこんな意外な言葉がこぼれでた。学歴も高く教養もあるまだ30代なかばの若い彼は、イラン人の9割以上は、革命がおこらなければよかったと思っている、と言うのだ。これにはちょっと驚いて、さすがに大袈裟だろうと話半分で聞いていたのだが、彼はその日におこった出来事を話しだした。僕らの乗った国内便の飛行機で、中間の座席だった彼の両側にはイラン人の老人がふたり座ったそうだ。乗客が全員搭乗してから、一時間もなんのアナウンスもなしに飛行機の出発が遅れたのだが、そのとき老人たちが彼に向かってこう謝ったという。

「革命なんておこしてまって、君ら若い世代に申し訳なかったね」

革命に中断されることなく国が発展していれば、もっと便利で信頼の置ける交通網が整備されていたはずだ、という意味らしい。

なるほどな。いくらか合点がいったような気がした。結局のところ、政府の言うことと国民の感じていることなど一致してはいないのだ。イラン政府が反米であるからといって、イラン人がみな反米というわけではない。国民たちの多くは、革命後の政府と自分たちのあいだの隔たりをしっかりと感じているのだろう。ただ、こういうことは広がって反政府デモにならない限り報道されることもないので、なかなか僕ら外国人には伝わってこない。

最近のイラクの状勢が悪化するにつれ、この地域の安定させるためのイランの役割の重要さが増している。これから世界におけるイランの影響力が広がっていくことは間違いないだろう。こんな時勢にここを訪れることができたのは幸いだった。勿論、国の表面をさらりとみただけで、社会の内部に根を下ろす問題などには触れることなどできなかったが、それでもイランはまたぜひ訪れたい場所のひとつになった。

だけどビールがないのと(ノンアルコールはどこでも手に入る)、あまりに魅力的な特産品が多くて財布のヒモを固くしめておくのが難しいのが玉に瑕かな。今回も、4日分の撮影で稼いだ金が、出国前にすべて一枚のカーペットになって消えてしまったし…。

no comments

Monthly photojournal “The Page” vol 13 is up

Monthly photojournal The Page vol 13 is up. This issue is from Haiti, Bahrain, Pakistan…etc.  (Sorry the words are in Japanese only)

月刊フォトジャーナルThePageの第13号アップされました。今回はハイチ、バーレーン、パキスタンなどから。

 

no comments

Censorship by Yahoo! Japan

I had an issue over the photograph I posted with my last article in Yahoo! News Japan, which is one of the hosts of my blog.

It was rejected because it showed a dead body and the page was ‘unpublicized’ immediately.  I was impressed by how fast the action took place (within a hour after my posting!) but also quite surprised by its over-sensitiveness. The photo, as you see in the previous post on this blog, shows a man lying down with a bit of blood on the ground. It’s one of the least graphic ones in my book and I didn’t think it would be so shocking or scandalous. Well, the degree of tolerance is up to each person so I won’t argue that here. What bothered me was that the editor at Yahoo! didn’t give me a chance to discuss the matter with her. Instead, she just unpublicized the whole page.

Below is a part of the email sent by the editor. I have never met the person before, and she doesn’t know me neither. Without having a discussion, the page was shut down shortly after the email was sent.

“Basically, Japanese media don’t publish pictures showing dead bodies. The photograph shows blood and a dead body directly and we are afraid it may offend our readers. I would ask you to eliminate or change the photo”

What is ‘basically’?  As far as I know, there is no such ‘basic’ rule or restriction applying to all media in Japan. I never had a problem publishing photographs which were much more graphic than this one in Japanese magazines. For television programs, I can somewhat understand the possibility of offending viewers by showing unexpected graphic images. But this is a news blog written by designated authors. Most of the readers make a conscious decision to visit my blog. Some readers may accidentally land on the page and may get shocked by the picture but even for that case, giving an advance warning message should avoid the problem.

When Yahoo! Japan asked me to contribute to its news blog, I assumed that they already knew about me and my photographs. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like the case. It seems to me that this incident is a typical example of Japanese media’s ‘Don’t make waves’ attitude to avoid any complaints from readers or viewers.

Coincidently, I just had a conversation with a Japanese journalist last week about coverage of deaths during Japan’s tsunami disaster in 2011. He told me that some television cameramen didn’t even film dead bodies in front of them because they knew the image wouldn’t be aired. I was shocked to realize how Japan’s ‘Don’t make waves’ attitude was spoiling the work of cameramen on the ground.

Even in western media, which I mostly shoot for and is more tolerant of death and blood than Japanese media, rarely use overly graphic images. But it doesn’t stop me from shooting it because I know that even if it doesn’t get published, recording the incident is an important part of our job. If you don’t photograph it, there won’t be any record when it may be needed in the future.

There have been several occasions in the past that made me think deeply about the usage of graphic images. One example was that when I had an exhibition in Japan. I insisted on displaying an image which I shot during Liberia’s civil war. It showed a little girl whose hand was torn off by mortar shrapnel. It was quite graphic but I thought it’s important to show how brutal and senseless the war can be. After the exhibition, the sponsor of the show told me that a female student got sick by looking at the photo and couldn’t proceed further to see other images. Because of one graphic photograph, I took the opportunity away from her to see other important images. This incident made me realize that my own belief and opinion don’t always translate or work as I intend. Since then, I have become much more careful about the usage of such images and I try to discuss with editors and exhibitors as much as possible so we can reach a certain agreement.

In this case with Yahoo!, the editor unilaterally took down the post without giving me an opportunity to discuss. It was quite ironic that this incident occurred in relation to the article on Mr. Sakai, who insisted on publishing these shocking images in a children’s book as he believed it to be meaningful.

~~~~

2日前の坂井社長について書いた記事に添えた写真の件で、同文を載せているYahoo!ニュースと一悶着あった。

記事との関わりもあって、拙書「ぼくの見た戦争」に掲載した写真を使用したのだが、死体が写っている、というだけの理由で、Yahoo!側によって記事全体が非公開にされてしまったのだ。記事をアップして1時間もたたないうちの処置で、その「検閲」の迅速さには感心させられたが、この過剰とも思える反応には驚かされた。このブログの前ポストをみてもらえればわかるように、死体とはいっても、人が横たわり、地面に血痕が残っている程度のもので、肉片が飛び散ったりしているような、特にグロテスクなものではない。拙書に掲載されているもののなかでも、控えめなものを選んだつもりだ。まあ、グロテスクに感じるかどうかは個人差があるので、ここでは議論しない。僕が不本意に思ったのは、きちんと編集者と意見を交換する機会も与えられぬままに、一方的に記事を非公開にされたことだ。

以下は担当の編集者から送られてきたメールからの抜粋だ。ちなみに僕はこの編集者とは一面識もないので、この人のことは何も知らないし、逆に先方は僕がどういうカメラマンで、これまでどういうものを撮ってきたかなどは多分知らない人だと思う。

「日本の報道機関では死体写真を掲載することは基本なく、流血も見えダイレクトであり、ショックを受ける読者もいると思われるため、削除または別の写真へのご変更をお願いできないでしょうか。
あえて児童向けに発売されたこととは異なり、Yahoo!ニュース上で発信されることは不特定多数が目にする可能性をもっていますので、どうかご理解をいただければ幸いです」

少々理解しにくい文章だが、まずはじめに、「日本の報道機関では死体写真を掲載することは基本なく、」とあるが、なにが「基本」なのだろうか?逆に言えば、基本でない報道の仕方もいくらでもあるわけで、僕のページがその「基本」とどういう関係にあるのか、それに従わなくてはならないのかなど、別に契約書に定められている訳でもない。「不特定多数」云々についても、テレビならまだある程度は理解できる。食事中に画面から予期せず死体の映像がとびだしてきたら、不快感を覚える人は少なくないだろう。しかし、このYahoo!ニュースのサイトなど、ほとんどの読者は自らの選択で「フォトジャーナリスト・高橋邦典」のページを訪れるのだ。(僕のページの読者など微々たる数だが)仮に偶然このページにたどりついて、死体の写真にたまげてしまう人がいるというのなら、あらかじめ写真がでる前に一言「閲覧注意」などの注意書きを入れておけばすむ事なのではないだろうか。

もともと僕は紛争や戦争も撮る報道写真家なので、Yahoo!側から記事寄稿の話が来た時に、こういう類いの写真を使う可能性など了解済みかと思っていた。どうやらそれはこちらの誤解だったようで、結局のところこのYahoo!ニュースにしても、臭いものには蓋をしろ、醜いものはみせるな、といった、読者からのクレームを恐れる商業メディアの「事なかれ主義」が露呈したようだ。

奇遇なことに、つい最近、東北の震災取材中の死体に関する以下のようなエピソードを、日本の記者から聞いたばかりだった。

日本のテレビ局のカメラマンたちは、どうせ番組で使われないのがわかっているから、目の前に遺体があっても撮ることもしなくなったというのだ。視聴者からのクレームを恐れるメディア組織の体質というのは、こうやって現場で働くカメラマンたちまでも腐らせていくのか、唖然とさせられてしまった。

日本に比べ、死体に対する許容度の高い西欧メディアで働く機会の多い僕も、さすがに死体だけをその目的のように真正面から撮るということはほとんどない。周りの状況を考え、伝えたいことのひとつとしてフレームの一部にそれをいれこんでいくわけだ。砲弾の犠牲者や拷問にあった者など、遺体がかなり残酷な状態なことが多いので、たとえ西欧のメディアでもその写真が使われる可能性は少ない。しかし、それがわかっていても、だから撮らない、ということはありえない。目の前の惨状を「記録」するということも、僕ら報道者の義務のひとつだと思っているからだ。撮らなければそれは記録としても残ることはないし、そこで終わり。撮ってさえおけば、たとえそれが現在放映や掲載されないとしても、記録として未来へと残される。将来、そんな画像が必要とされることがくるかもしれないのだ。

死体に限らず、肉片のあらわになった怪我人の写真など、グロテスクといわれる写真の出版や展示に関しては、僕自身いろいろ試行錯誤してきた。リベリア内戦時に撮影した、右手を砲弾で引き裂かれた少女の写真があったが、これは戦争というものの醜さを直視的にあらわし、僕にとっても思い入れのある写真だったので、写真展でも極力トリミングなしで展示するようにしていた。しかしある展示場で、主催者からこんな報告があったのだ。女子中学生がこの写真をみて気分が悪くなり、その先の展示をみることができなくなった、と。醜い戦争の現実を知ってもらいたい、という思いで展示したものだったが、逆にその一枚が原因で、他の写真をみてもらう機会を逃してしまうことになった。この一件は、僕の一方的な思い込みやメッセージを押し付けるような写真の使い方の是非を、あらためて考えさせてくれるいい機会となった。その後、そういった写真に関しては、主催者や編集者を含め、いろいろな可能性を考慮しながら、みながある程度納得できるように、ケースバイケースで対応するようにしている。

繰り返しになるが、そういう機会を著者に与えずに、一方的にサイトを非公開にしたYahoo!ニュースの措置を非常に残念に思う。死体写真が載っていても、「これを児童書でだすから意味があるんだ」と啖呵を切ってくれた坂井社長のことを書いた記事でこんな問題がおこるとは、なんとも皮肉としかいいようがない。

 

 

 

show hide 2 comments

Keisuke Togawa - 僕が小学生のとき、広島長崎の原爆展でおぞましい死者の写真を観て、数日、怯えていました。すると祖父が「人にとって人がもっとも恐ろしい—わかっただろ?」。「人は人を簡単に殺せるんだ」。戦場体験者の祖父の言葉によって、僕は命の尊さを知り、冷静さを取り戻すことができました。しかし、僕は目の前で人が殺されて行くのを見たことが無いので、本当の恐ろしさを知りません。本当の恐ろしさを知ることが必要なのかどうなのかとなれば、知る必要があると思います。本当の恐ろしさとは表面的なことだけでなく内面の恐ろしさも含めてです。

Kuni Takahashi - 「はだしのゲン」のことといい、いまの日本はまた戦前の風潮に逆戻りしているようで怖いですね。