Drought in The World’s Wettest Place – Cherrapunjee

Bookmark this on Hatena Bookmark
Hatena Bookmark - Drought in The World’s Wettest Place – Cherrapunjee
Share on Facebook
Post to Google Buzz
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark
Bookmark this on Livedoor Clip
Share on FriendFeed
[`tweetmeme` not found]

I had the chance to visit one of the world’s “wettest places” in India’s northeast region.

Cherrapunjee, surrounded by mountains in Meghalaya state and located on the path of the monsoon from the Bay of Bengal, set a world record for rainfall in a year in 1861 with 22,987mm. This place has an average rainfall of more than 10,000mm, which is 7-8 times more than the rainfall in Tokyo.

Despite how wet Cherrapunjee is, people in the villages began suffering from water shortages during the dry season between December and March in recent years. I visited the area during the midst of dry season. The long queue of buckets and tin cans are seen in front of community water taps. Villagers said that they only get 2 hours of water supply daily.

Of course, global warming is mainly blamed. Rainfall has been down almost 20 percent in the last 10 years and the dry season has become longer. Average temperature is now up 2-3 degrees. Also, the town’s population has increased more than 15 times over the last 40 years.

They still have a decent amount of rainfall, and you would think that building more water tanks would solve the problem.  That’s right, but they don’t have enough money. It’s the northeast region – one of India’s most ignored and left-behind places.

It’s been awhile since we started talking about global warming, and there is no place in the world that has escaped the damage. The pollution created by cities also contaminates remote lands like Cherrapunjee.

I was told that Cherrapunjee means “the home of clouds” in Sanskrit. I didn’t know rainfall could be a tourist attraction but lots of tourists used to visit there to see the thick clouds surrounding the mountains and the many waterfalls. Villagers said that the number has declined, especially of foreign tourists. No one is interested in dry Cherrapunjee…

~~~~

インド北東部にある「世界でもっとも雨の多い土地」のひとつを訪れる機会があった。

メガラヤ州山々に囲まれた町チェラプンジ。集落が点在するこの土地は、ベンガル湾からの湿風の影響で雨が多く、1861年には22987ミリという世界最高の年間降水量を記録した。普段でも平均10000ミリ以上の降水量なので、東京の7—8倍は降っていることになる。

こんなに湿った場所であるのに関わらず、近年12月から3月にかけての乾季には、水不足に悩まされるようになった。僕がこの地を訪れたのはその乾季のまっただ中。村に点在する共有水道には、朝の9時にはポリタンクやバケツの長い列ができていた。この時期は一日に朝の2時間しか水の供給がないそうだ。

主な原因はやはり地球温暖化による気候の変化だ。ここ10年の降水量は2割程減ったうえ、乾季が長くなった。さらに、気温も平均2—3度上昇したという。人口増加の影響もある。この40年間で町の人口は15倍以上にも膨れ上がった。

それでもこれだけの雨が降る土地だから、貯水施設を整えれば水不足を乗り切れるはずだが、インドでも中央政府から無視され続け、経済発展から取り残された北東部の貧しい土地にそんな予算はない。

もう地球温暖化という言葉が聞かれるようになって久しいが、もうその影響から逃れられる場所など世界にはないのだろう。都市部でつくられる温暖化という「公害」は、辺境な田舎町をも汚染するのだ。

サンスクリット語で「雲の住処」という意味のチェラプンジ。僕は正直なところ、多雨が観光目的になることなどこれまで知らなかったのだが、その名のとおり山を覆う厚い雲、勢い良く流れるいくつもの滝を目当てにこの町を訪れていた多くの外国人観光客の数も減り続けているという。乾いたチェラプンジなど、誰も見に来ない、ということか。

 

 

 

no comments

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

There was an error submitting your comment. Please try again.