Liberia’s Civil War : Ten Years Later vol.2

Bookmark this on Hatena Bookmark
Hatena Bookmark - Liberia’s Civil War : Ten Years Later vol.2
Share on Facebook
Post to Google Buzz
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark
Bookmark this on Livedoor Clip
Share on FriendFeed
[`tweetmeme` not found]

Ten years ago last month, Liberia’s civil war ended after 14 years of on-and-off battles as notorious president Charles Taylor left the country.

Since covering the fierce fighting in the capital city Monrovia in 2003, I have been documenting Liberia’s post-war rebuilding process and a few months ago, I visited the country on my 6th trip.

At this time I noticed many positive changes like new hotels, restaurants, paved roads, more streetlights and such. At the Waterside market – once the front line of bloody battles where billboards and shops were scarred like beehives by thousands of bullets, now you can find absolutely nothing to remind you of the war.

Although the country seems to be moving forward under the command of Africa’s first female president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who took office in 2006, the pace of development is not as fast as ordinary people expected. Once you step off the main road, you can see people living pretty much the same as right after the war ended. People still suffer from no electricity and no proper water supply, while the price of rice, the main staple for Liberians, has almost tripled. The biggest problem is the lack of jobs.

“I am lucky to have a job but my brothers and sisters couldn’t find any work. I have eight family members to support and my salary is not enough”

A woman who works at an international NGO complained to me.

It seemed to me that development has only benefited the upper class by giving them more opportunities to make money but the lower class has been left behind. There are hundreds of former child soldiers, who are now mid-teens with no education or vocational skills, and struggle greatly. Many of them are surviving on occasional daily labor or selling small products like sandals or matches.

I understand that it wouldn’t be an easy task to lift the whole country up but to be honest, I was expecting to see more done, considering it’s been already a ten years.

My fear is that another war would take place by frustrated, jobless young people if the situation doesn’t improve for them. As they keep seeing the gaps between rich and poor grow greater and greater, their hope for a better life diminishes and they may become overly bitter against the ruling class and the government.

I hope my concerns are unfounded and I’m overly worried. I don’t know when my next visit to Liberia will be but I surely hope to see more happy faces around.

(related post : Liberia’s Civil War : Ten Years Later vol.1 )

〜〜〜〜

悪名高いチャールズ・テーラー大統領の国外亡命によって、西アフリカのリベリア共和国で14年にわたり断続的に続いていた内戦が終焉を迎えたのが今から10年前の8月11日。

首都モンロビアが激しい戦闘のまっただ中にあった2003年7月以来、僕は内戦後もこの国の復興をずっと追い続けてきたが、今年3月、6度目となるリベリアを訪れた。

新しいホテルやレストラン、きれいに舗装された道路やそれを照らす街灯など、多くの変化に気づかされる。内戦時には戦いの最前線になって、ビルボードや店の壁が銃弾で蜂の巣のごとく穴だらけになっていたウォーターサイド市場にも、いまや戦闘の名残など何ひとつ残っていはいない。

アフリカ初の女性大統領として、2006年からリベリアを主導してきたエレン・ジョンソン・サーリーフのもと、表向きこの国は順調な発展を遂げつつあるようにみえる。しかしそのペースは、人々の期待にはまだまだ追いついていないようだ。一旦表通りをはずれ路地にはいってみれば、住人たちの暮らしは内戦直後とほとんど変わってはいないのは一目瞭然。ほとんどの家にはまだ電気もとおっていないし、水道も昔からの共同の井戸があるだけ。おまけに主食である米の値段はこの数年で3倍にも跳ね上がり、生活はすこしも楽にならない。最も深刻なのは、いまだに多くの人々が仕事につけずにいるということだ。

「わたしは仕事があるからラッキーだけど、兄弟姉妹だれひとり職にありつけない。家族8人を私の給料で養うのはむずかしいわ」

国際NGOで働く女性がこう愚痴をこぼした。

国の偏った復興は、裕福層やビジネスマンたちにさらなる金儲けのチャンスを生み出だしたが、国民の大部分を占める貧困層は置き去りにされたままだ。内戦中に銃を手に戦っていた少年兵たちは、いまや20代半ば。本来なら働き盛りの年頃なのに、教育も技術も持たない彼らの多くは、不定期の日雇い労働や、サンダルやマッチなど小物売りの行商でなんとか生きのびている。

国を建て直す、ということが一筋縄でいかないことは理解できるが、それでも10年という年月を考えれば、正直なところ僕はもっと復興が進んでいると予想していた。このままの状態が今後も続けば、不満をためこんだ若者たちがまた内戦をおこすのではないか、という懸念を持たずにはいられない。今後さらに富む者と貧困層の差は広がっていくだろうし、職の無い若者達が将来への希望を失ったとき、政府や上流階級に対して、彼らが再び銃を手に反乱をおこすことがないとは言い切れないだろう。

願わくは、僕のそんな心配は杞憂であってほしいものだ。次にリベリアを訪れるのがいつになるかはわからないが、そのときにはもっと多くの笑顔がみられるように祈りたい。

(関連記事:リベリア内戦から10年(その1)

no comments

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

There was an error submitting your comment. Please try again.