Censorship by Yahoo! Japan

Bookmark this on Hatena Bookmark
Hatena Bookmark - Censorship by Yahoo! Japan
Share on Facebook
Post to Google Buzz
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark
Bookmark this on Livedoor Clip
Share on FriendFeed
[`tweetmeme` not found]

I had an issue over the photograph I posted with my last article in Yahoo! News Japan, which is one of the hosts of my blog.

It was rejected because it showed a dead body and the page was ‘unpublicized’ immediately.  I was impressed by how fast the action took place (within a hour after my posting!) but also quite surprised by its over-sensitiveness. The photo, as you see in the previous post on this blog, shows a man lying down with a bit of blood on the ground. It’s one of the least graphic ones in my book and I didn’t think it would be so shocking or scandalous. Well, the degree of tolerance is up to each person so I won’t argue that here. What bothered me was that the editor at Yahoo! didn’t give me a chance to discuss the matter with her. Instead, she just unpublicized the whole page.

Below is a part of the email sent by the editor. I have never met the person before, and she doesn’t know me neither. Without having a discussion, the page was shut down shortly after the email was sent.

“Basically, Japanese media don’t publish pictures showing dead bodies. The photograph shows blood and a dead body directly and we are afraid it may offend our readers. I would ask you to eliminate or change the photo”

What is ‘basically’?  As far as I know, there is no such ‘basic’ rule or restriction applying to all media in Japan. I never had a problem publishing photographs which were much more graphic than this one in Japanese magazines. For television programs, I can somewhat understand the possibility of offending viewers by showing unexpected graphic images. But this is a news blog written by designated authors. Most of the readers make a conscious decision to visit my blog. Some readers may accidentally land on the page and may get shocked by the picture but even for that case, giving an advance warning message should avoid the problem.

When Yahoo! Japan asked me to contribute to its news blog, I assumed that they already knew about me and my photographs. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like the case. It seems to me that this incident is a typical example of Japanese media’s ‘Don’t make waves’ attitude to avoid any complaints from readers or viewers.

Coincidently, I just had a conversation with a Japanese journalist last week about coverage of deaths during Japan’s tsunami disaster in 2011. He told me that some television cameramen didn’t even film dead bodies in front of them because they knew the image wouldn’t be aired. I was shocked to realize how Japan’s ‘Don’t make waves’ attitude was spoiling the work of cameramen on the ground.

Even in western media, which I mostly shoot for and is more tolerant of death and blood than Japanese media, rarely use overly graphic images. But it doesn’t stop me from shooting it because I know that even if it doesn’t get published, recording the incident is an important part of our job. If you don’t photograph it, there won’t be any record when it may be needed in the future.

There have been several occasions in the past that made me think deeply about the usage of graphic images. One example was that when I had an exhibition in Japan. I insisted on displaying an image which I shot during Liberia’s civil war. It showed a little girl whose hand was torn off by mortar shrapnel. It was quite graphic but I thought it’s important to show how brutal and senseless the war can be. After the exhibition, the sponsor of the show told me that a female student got sick by looking at the photo and couldn’t proceed further to see other images. Because of one graphic photograph, I took the opportunity away from her to see other important images. This incident made me realize that my own belief and opinion don’t always translate or work as I intend. Since then, I have become much more careful about the usage of such images and I try to discuss with editors and exhibitors as much as possible so we can reach a certain agreement.

In this case with Yahoo!, the editor unilaterally took down the post without giving me an opportunity to discuss. It was quite ironic that this incident occurred in relation to the article on Mr. Sakai, who insisted on publishing these shocking images in a children’s book as he believed it to be meaningful.

~~~~

2日前の坂井社長について書いた記事に添えた写真の件で、同文を載せているYahoo!ニュースと一悶着あった。

記事との関わりもあって、拙書「ぼくの見た戦争」に掲載した写真を使用したのだが、死体が写っている、というだけの理由で、Yahoo!側によって記事全体が非公開にされてしまったのだ。記事をアップして1時間もたたないうちの処置で、その「検閲」の迅速さには感心させられたが、この過剰とも思える反応には驚かされた。このブログの前ポストをみてもらえればわかるように、死体とはいっても、人が横たわり、地面に血痕が残っている程度のもので、肉片が飛び散ったりしているような、特にグロテスクなものではない。拙書に掲載されているもののなかでも、控えめなものを選んだつもりだ。まあ、グロテスクに感じるかどうかは個人差があるので、ここでは議論しない。僕が不本意に思ったのは、きちんと編集者と意見を交換する機会も与えられぬままに、一方的に記事を非公開にされたことだ。

以下は担当の編集者から送られてきたメールからの抜粋だ。ちなみに僕はこの編集者とは一面識もないので、この人のことは何も知らないし、逆に先方は僕がどういうカメラマンで、これまでどういうものを撮ってきたかなどは多分知らない人だと思う。

「日本の報道機関では死体写真を掲載することは基本なく、流血も見えダイレクトであり、ショックを受ける読者もいると思われるため、削除または別の写真へのご変更をお願いできないでしょうか。
あえて児童向けに発売されたこととは異なり、Yahoo!ニュース上で発信されることは不特定多数が目にする可能性をもっていますので、どうかご理解をいただければ幸いです」

少々理解しにくい文章だが、まずはじめに、「日本の報道機関では死体写真を掲載することは基本なく、」とあるが、なにが「基本」なのだろうか?逆に言えば、基本でない報道の仕方もいくらでもあるわけで、僕のページがその「基本」とどういう関係にあるのか、それに従わなくてはならないのかなど、別に契約書に定められている訳でもない。「不特定多数」云々についても、テレビならまだある程度は理解できる。食事中に画面から予期せず死体の映像がとびだしてきたら、不快感を覚える人は少なくないだろう。しかし、このYahoo!ニュースのサイトなど、ほとんどの読者は自らの選択で「フォトジャーナリスト・高橋邦典」のページを訪れるのだ。(僕のページの読者など微々たる数だが)仮に偶然このページにたどりついて、死体の写真にたまげてしまう人がいるというのなら、あらかじめ写真がでる前に一言「閲覧注意」などの注意書きを入れておけばすむ事なのではないだろうか。

もともと僕は紛争や戦争も撮る報道写真家なので、Yahoo!側から記事寄稿の話が来た時に、こういう類いの写真を使う可能性など了解済みかと思っていた。どうやらそれはこちらの誤解だったようで、結局のところこのYahoo!ニュースにしても、臭いものには蓋をしろ、醜いものはみせるな、といった、読者からのクレームを恐れる商業メディアの「事なかれ主義」が露呈したようだ。

奇遇なことに、つい最近、東北の震災取材中の死体に関する以下のようなエピソードを、日本の記者から聞いたばかりだった。

日本のテレビ局のカメラマンたちは、どうせ番組で使われないのがわかっているから、目の前に遺体があっても撮ることもしなくなったというのだ。視聴者からのクレームを恐れるメディア組織の体質というのは、こうやって現場で働くカメラマンたちまでも腐らせていくのか、唖然とさせられてしまった。

日本に比べ、死体に対する許容度の高い西欧メディアで働く機会の多い僕も、さすがに死体だけをその目的のように真正面から撮るということはほとんどない。周りの状況を考え、伝えたいことのひとつとしてフレームの一部にそれをいれこんでいくわけだ。砲弾の犠牲者や拷問にあった者など、遺体がかなり残酷な状態なことが多いので、たとえ西欧のメディアでもその写真が使われる可能性は少ない。しかし、それがわかっていても、だから撮らない、ということはありえない。目の前の惨状を「記録」するということも、僕ら報道者の義務のひとつだと思っているからだ。撮らなければそれは記録としても残ることはないし、そこで終わり。撮ってさえおけば、たとえそれが現在放映や掲載されないとしても、記録として未来へと残される。将来、そんな画像が必要とされることがくるかもしれないのだ。

死体に限らず、肉片のあらわになった怪我人の写真など、グロテスクといわれる写真の出版や展示に関しては、僕自身いろいろ試行錯誤してきた。リベリア内戦時に撮影した、右手を砲弾で引き裂かれた少女の写真があったが、これは戦争というものの醜さを直視的にあらわし、僕にとっても思い入れのある写真だったので、写真展でも極力トリミングなしで展示するようにしていた。しかしある展示場で、主催者からこんな報告があったのだ。女子中学生がこの写真をみて気分が悪くなり、その先の展示をみることができなくなった、と。醜い戦争の現実を知ってもらいたい、という思いで展示したものだったが、逆にその一枚が原因で、他の写真をみてもらう機会を逃してしまうことになった。この一件は、僕の一方的な思い込みやメッセージを押し付けるような写真の使い方の是非を、あらためて考えさせてくれるいい機会となった。その後、そういった写真に関しては、主催者や編集者を含め、いろいろな可能性を考慮しながら、みながある程度納得できるように、ケースバイケースで対応するようにしている。

繰り返しになるが、そういう機会を著者に与えずに、一方的にサイトを非公開にしたYahoo!ニュースの措置を非常に残念に思う。死体写真が載っていても、「これを児童書でだすから意味があるんだ」と啖呵を切ってくれた坂井社長のことを書いた記事でこんな問題がおこるとは、なんとも皮肉としかいいようがない。

 

 

 

show hide 2 comments

Keisuke Togawa 僕が小学生のとき、広島長崎の原爆展でおぞましい死者の写真を観て、数日、怯えていました。すると祖父が「人にとって人がもっとも恐ろしい—わかっただろ?」。「人は人を簡単に殺せるんだ」。戦場体験者の祖父の言葉によって、僕は命の尊さを知り、冷静さを取り戻すことができました。しかし、僕は目の前で人が殺されて行くのを見たことが無いので、本当の恐ろしさを知りません。本当の恐ろしさを知ることが必要なのかどうなのかとなれば、知る必要があると思います。本当の恐ろしさとは表面的なことだけでなく内面の恐ろしさも含めてです。

Kuni Takahashi 「はだしのゲン」のことといい、いまの日本はまた戦前の風潮に逆戻りしているようで怖いですね。

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

There was an error submitting your comment. Please try again.