Thoughts on My Exhibition of War

Bookmark this on Hatena Bookmark
Hatena Bookmark - Thoughts on My Exhibition of War
Share on Facebook
Post to Google Buzz
Bookmark this on Yahoo Bookmark
Bookmark this on Livedoor Clip
Share on FriendFeed
[`tweetmeme` not found]

Came back to steamy Delhi last week after spending a couple of weeks in Japan to attend my exhibition at the Canon gallery. It went well (the show is still traveling to three more cities in Japan) and I had good conversations with visitors.

The title of the exhibition was “Message from the Battlefield” and it’s a collection of pictures from conflict zones I’ve photographed in the last 15 years. Unfortunately, I was able to exhibit only 60% of what I wanted to show because of restrictions set by Canon: “No dead bodies and no blood can be shown.” The exhibition was about war so I couldn’t understand how they could impose such a request. Although I didn’t fully agree with the conditions, the opportunity was too good to miss. I compromised by adding a few images which ‘partially’ showing dead body and blood.

This kind of nonsense happens not only with Canon but everywhere in Japan, including by Yahoo! Japan which I have mentioned in this blog before. It’s a reflection of a conservative ‘Don’t rock the boat’ attitude of Japanese corporations. It comes down to the fact that no one wants to take responsibility in case viewers complain.

Because of this reason, most of photo exhibitions in Japan are about non-controversial themes like landscape and animals. Any themes with politics, wars and serious social issues are completely out of favor. One of sad example is the cancellation of a photo exhibition by Nikon gallery in 2012. Nikon suddenly canceled a show about “comfort women” (sexual slaves during the war used by Japanese soldiers) because of pressure from right-wing and anti-immigrant groups.

“We seldom see these kind of pictures in galleries”

As many visitors of my exhibition told me, unfortunately there are very few major galleries that deal with photographs of wars, conflicts and hard news.

Helped by a few newspaper articles, more than 1,200 people visited my exhibition in six days, which was far more than I expected. Although I was able to speak to only a small portion of them in person, it was encouraging to be told by many that they felt these images should be shown more often and in more places.  I realized that controversial images are avoided not because people don’t want to see them but because those who could show them worry too much. They underestimate viewers by assuming that disturbing issues like war and conflict aren’t of interest. They are too scared of offending through shocking images. It’s an act of ‘self-censorship’.

Japan seems to be quickly moving backward toward a dangerous pre-war era of militarism with the recent introduction of a sweeping new law to protect state secrets and moves to expand the overseas military activities of its Self-Defense Forces. At this critical time, self-censorship keeps happening, and we should realize that it’s extinguishing our civil liberties, the public’s right to know, and the opportunity to think freely.

~~~~

2週間の日本滞在を終えて、先週また暑いデリーに戻ってきた。

今回は、キャノン・ギャラリーでの自分の個展開催のために東京に戻ったのだが、銀座の会場に詰めているあいだ、訪れてくれた人々と話をしながらいろいろと考えさせられた。

個展のタイトルは「紛争地からのメッセージ」。その名のとおり、僕がこれまで15年ほどのあいだに訪れた紛争地からの写真を集めたものだが、実は僕がみせたかった写真の6割程しか展示できなかった。キャノンから「死体や血はダメ」と釘をさされていたからだ。

「戦争写真の展示なのに、死体や血がみせられないとは…」

どうにも理解し難い条件ではあったが、ここで意地を張ってせっかくの機会を逃すのも惜しいので、妥協の上、死体や血も「ちょっとだけ出した」作品を混ぜ込んだ。

まあこういった要求はキャノンに限ったことではなく、以前このブログでも紹介したヤフー・ジャパンとの一件も含めて、日本企業の保守的な「事なかれ主義」なのだと思う。結局のところ、死体などの衝撃的(?)な写真を展示して、見た人から苦情がきたら誰も責任をとりたがらない、ということなのだろう。こんな状況だから、写真展でいえば、日本でひらかれるものの大半は風景や動物など当たり障りのないものばかりで、政治的な主張を含んだり、社会的問題提議をするようなものは敬遠されがちになる。一昨年にニコン・ギャラリーが、開催の決まっていた安世鴻氏の慰安婦写真展を、在特会や右翼の脅しに負けて一方的に中止したのも情けない一例だ。僕の写真展を訪れてくれた人々の何人もが、「こういった写真はなかなかギャラリーでみる機会がない」と言っていたように、今の日本のメジャーなギャラリー、特に企業の絡む会場で、現代の戦争や社会問題を扱ってくれるところなど、非常に少ないのではないだろうか?

いくつかの新聞社がとりあげてくれたこともあって、6日間で1200人以上という、僕が予想していたより遥かに多くの人たちが今回の個展を訪れてくれた。面と向かって話ができたのはそのうちほんの一部だが、「もっとこういう写真を頻繁に、多くの人たちにみせるべきだ」と言ってくれた人が少なくなかったことは励みだ。と同時に、こんなことに気づかされた。実は、人々がみたくないからこういった写真が展示されにくいのではなくて、みせる側が、「こういう硬くて深刻な題材は一般受けしない」とか「ショッキングな写真をみて気分を害したという苦情が怖い」という理由で単に「自己規制」しているだけなんじゃないか、と。

特定秘密保護法案とか集団的自由権の閣議決定などで、いまの日本はすごいスピードで歴史を逆行し、戦前に戻るかの如く危ない方向に向かっている。そんななか、メディアやギャラリーのように「発信する側」が、こんな検閲のような「自己規制」を続けていくのは問題だと思う。これはぼくら国民から、知る権利や考える機会を確実に奪っているのだから。

 

 

 

 

 

show hide 2 comments

Keisuke Togawa 面と向かって雑談した一人です。
お疲れさまでした。

原爆写真は白黒だからOKなんでしょうか。
しかしカメラメーカーのCANONがそのような姿勢ではナンセンスです。
クレームを理由にする官民国民の体質。
僕はLeicaに変えます(苦笑
そして血のにじんだステーキなどの写真展をしたいと思います。

http://manda10kichi.blog.fc2.com/

Manda この記事を読み終わったアメリカの友人は、ha?! でした。
「ショッキングな写真をみて気分を害したという苦情が怖い」
だったらカメラを売るんじゃない。写真を見て気分を害するならおとなしくウチで寝てろ。
そのように感想を述べていました。

あるアメリカ人の発言「FreeとFreedomは異なる」。
つまり現実はunFreeだってことでしょうか。

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

*

*

There was an error submitting your comment. Please try again.